Summer Flying in Jerusalem

Every year as the month of August comes to an end, 

sign in Hebrew

there are certain signs of the end of summer, 

besides the outdoor performances at the Jerusalem Theater.

Facebook is full of posts of those returning from overseas.

Another summer, time has flown by with visitors and festivals.

 All over Jerusalem, Israel, as every year until school starts, 

  parents will call on extended family and friends or strangers,

or just make it another ‘take your kid to work’ day,  

in all kind of offices, and even banks.

For those with time and energy there is the Bloomfield Science Museum.

people in the Jerusalem market, shuk photo

 Also, always a good venue for a day trip,

 the Machane Yehuda market, the shuk,

but when it gets crowded, holding on is a great idea.

Teddy Park fountain at night

New this year, the Teddy Park fountain has proven extremely popular.

And,

photo kites, Kite Festival

the annual Kite Festival

Israel Museum Kite Festival

at the Israel Museum

kites in air Israel Museum

is an old favorite with thousands of families,

Israel Museum kite flying

 popular with all ages.

man with large kite, Kite festival Jerusalem

Large kites,

Kites flying . Kite Festival jerusalem, Israel Museum

flown by pros were up in the afternoon breeze,

girl with kite, Kite Festival Jerusalem

however, this little girl did a great job of keeping hers flying.

kites flying, Jerusalem kite festival Israel Museum

Israeli flag kites were on sale and popular.

large kite down, Jerusalem kite festival

But while some of the large professional flags got stuck in trees, 

what was really impressive this year, 

kite, kite in sky, Kite festival Israel museum

were the number of hand-made children’s projects that were flying high in the sky.

No matter what is happening on the ground and all around,

Kite festival Israel Museum

leave it to Israelis to love to just go fly a kite.

Aliens Land on the Knesset or Go Fly a Kite

No matter what you read in the media about Israel,

the end of August is all about what to do with the kids.

There are no regular ganim and school does not begin until next week.

Take the kids to “office camp” is an option, or

call on the grandparents or any able-bodied (even non) adult,

to help look after them.

There many things to do in Jerusalem, Israel, in August, 

but the annual kite festival at the Israel Museum is one of my favorites.

kite

Looking up at the colorful kites can be dangerous,

The Israel Museum

if you are not careful and trip on the strings on the ground.

kite

Many kites got stuck in the trees,

The Israel Museum

but people were still smiling anyway,

The Israel Museum

except this one man on the wall who was determined to get his kite down.

kite, The Israel Museum

Not all the kites ended up in the trees though,

The Israel Museum

as some soared over the crowd 

kite, The Israel Museum

in the Billy Rose Sculpture Garden.

kite, The Israel Museum

Blue and white kites were popular this year

The Israel Museum

 with many of the families who filled the grounds.

For this 27th annual event, over 7000 people registered, 

The Israel Museum ,

and even more spread out over the wide expanse of the Israel Museum.

The Israel Museum

There were not just colorful kites,

but also Kabuki Theater entertainers,

The Israel Museum

providing music,

The Israel Museum

and more color along with entertainment.

The Knesset

So did aliens land on the Knesset?  Not really.

The Knesset is across the road from the museum and this soaring kite 

The Knesset

looked like it was landing on the roof.

No aliens landed, and there was no violence, 

kites, The Israel Museum

 just enough wind and music and kites, for a day of families and fun.

 

More photos to be posted on The Real Jerusalem Streets Facebook Page.

Feeling Festive

Over 130 missiles, rockets and grads were fired from Gaza

into southern Israel last week and major cities were hit.

People were killed, injured, shocked, and left homeless.

Meanwhile, 81 US congressmen arrived in Israel and left rather quietly.

With a Hamas request for a cease-fire came a security alert in Jerusalem.

But it is festival season in Jerusalem:  how did the real streets respond?

The last night of annual wine festival at the Israel Museum was held,

though many were not in a much of party mood after hearing

that 8 Israelis were murdered in ambushes that afternoon near Eilat.

Infected Mushrooms performed on Thursday night as scheduled.

The massive stage in Gan Sacher, Sacher Park remained in place until

 for a free concert for young people which lasted until midnight.

The Friday Arts and Crafts Market on Bezalel Street was open for business,

  while the tent protest was nearby and the light-rail had its first public runs.


The 26th Kite Festival at the Israel Museum got off to a slow start.

At noon the water over the Dome of the Book

was the only thing that could be seen in up in the air,

but later in the afternoon breeze there were dozens of kites

and hundreds of families enjoying the annual festival.

The annual Puppet Festival is over,

but the Children’s Film Festival has just begun at the Cinemateque.

The end of August also means that it is time for

The International Arts and Crafts Fair.

 The International exhibits and sales, food, music and performances

fill the area known as the Sultan’s Pool below the Old City walls

and Khutzot Hayoser, The Artists’ Colony comes to life.

It will take more than a security alert to get people to miss

 this popular end of summer event

or to keep them out of Mamilla Mall.

The 5th End of Summer Celebration has begun at the Jerusalem Theater,

with various performances taking place outside on the plaza.

If these events are not enough, 

 the Beer Festival is to be held next week in the Old Train Station.

The security alert may not be readily perceptible on the Jerusalem streets,

but it could be felt in synagogue service this past Shabbat,

with the quiet attention of worshipers during the prayer for the State of Israel

and especially for the prayer for the safety of its soldiers,

and the loud unified response by the congregation of

  “Amen.”