Syrians Looking to Israel for Safety

Syrians Looking to Israel for Safety

When you were young, what did your parents tell you when you didn’t want to eat all your dinner?

Parents around the world told their children to finish all the food on their plate, “because children were starving in China” or “hungry in Africa.”

In Syria, a mother told her young son, “If you do not finish your dinner, “Big Zionists will come and drink your blood.”

Imagine this young man’s surprise to find himself taken to Israel by the IDF for life-saving medical treatment, waking up in a hospital where the signs were in Arabic and the staff spoke his language.

Arab couple walking outside Galilee Medical Center

One of the northern Israeli hospitals treating wounded Syrians is the Galilee Medical Center (GMC). It has taken over 1,500 of the 5-6,000 Syrians that Israel has treated.

What began with seven patients on February 16, 2013, has grown over the years. Word slowly traveled back over the border that if you want the best medical treatment, go to Israel.

Syrian man in Jerusalem Israel who was treated in Israeli hospital

Treating patients from Arab countries, Gaza, or Syria, is not new.  A Syrian father who accompanied a son to Jerusalem for medical treatment, fell ill, and was treated in a hospital in Jerusalem in May of 2014. Here he is recuperating on a bed in the center of Jerusalem.

Then, as now, for their safety when they return to Syria, no names, no photos of faces are used to identity these patients. Having received life-saving treatment which is only available in Israel could be a death sentence for those patients when they return to Syria.

Farm land in Galil on way to Golan Israel

On a trip to the Golan from Jerusalem, Israel, one passes cultivated fields.

Israeli cemetery with new apartments being built near by

Rising apartment blocks for housing are seen, even on the outskirts of a municipal cemetery.

Galilee Medical Center map of northern Israel

This map of northern Israel shows the Nahariya area where the GMC is located.  More than 800 Katyushas were fired here during the Second Lebanon War, one hit and destroyed an entire department on the 4th floor of the hospital.

Pleasant scene in Golan guest houses Alonei Ha'Bashan

The northern border has been quiet for the last few years of the “Good Neighbor” policy.

Galilee Medical Center underground surgery area

But the GMC Underground Hospital unit is ready if the need arises to evacuate patients again.

Syrian man being treated in Israel hospital

This Syrian patient, Hani from Ghutta, near Damascus, has been receiving treatment for two years. Currently there are 40 Syrians at GMC and more at other northern Israeli hospitals.

Jeeps for ride to Golan Heights

Jeeps are necessary to get to the Golan Heights vantage point, as a bus could not safely navigate the narrow and winding roads up the mountain.

Syrian border from Israeli Golan Heights

This is the view from the Bashan Hazaka observation point,

Syrians near border of Israel for safety

and a close up view of the area in southern Syria, near the Israeli border.

View of Syria from Golan Heights

This is the view to the left, and  at the bottom of the photo, there is a yellow sign warning of land mines.

Southern Syria mountain top close up

Here is a close up of the top of the hill that appears in the distance in the previous picture.

Golan Heights view of Syria

Look to the right, from the observation point and one sees a cluster of trees.

From Israel Golan Heights Syrian refugees near border

However, in a close up of the area, one sees the tents more clearly.  These green IDF tents were supplied to homeless Syrians.

Syrian refugee camp as seen from Golan Heights

Displaced Syrian refugees have come to the border of Israel for their own safety.

From Golan Heights tent in Syria for refugees

Bringing their families and whatever they can schlep, they are getting away from the Russians bombing from above and Assad’s forces, aided by Iran and Hezbollah, shooting to kill on the ground.

Syrian Israeli border rusty tank

Reminders of the previous Israeli-Syrian wars are still around, as evidenced by the rusty tank in the bottom of this photo.

Abandoned Syrian bunkers on Golan Heights

At the observation point on top of Bashan are remains of Syrian bunkers and old army vehicle.

Abandoned Syrian bunkers on top of Golan Heights

In the past the Syrians were here shooting down at Israelis over the Kinneret, the Sea of Galilee.

Head of IDF medical unit in Golan Heights pointing to Syria

Lt. Colonel Dr. Tomer Koller, the medical officer of the Bashan Division in the Golan Heights, showed us the area where tens of thousands of Syrians are encamped. Those in need of medical treatment come there to find assistance.

How could anyone think it is a good idea to “give back” the Golan Heights to Syria?

view of Kinneret at sunset

After many years, the Kinneret  is again under threat from the intensified Syrian civil war.

The IDF Good Neighbor Operation has been helping.

Israeli residents in the north have gathered aid to send.

Mendi Safadi of the Safadi Center is working to open schools for the children displaced in Syria.

Frontier Alliance International (FAI) is working with IDF to get international doctors into Syria to help with the medical crisis.

Arab countries have shut their borders to Syria.

Where have the UN, EU, and human rights organizations been all these years?

Because of the growing humanitarian crisis, fleeing Syrians are flocking to the Israeli border.

Perhaps the next generation in Syria will not be taught to fear “blood thirsty Zionists.”

 

Jerusalem More Than Dream

Jerusalem More Than Dream

“Next year in Jerusalem”

has been for centuries,

the mantra of the Jewish people.

At the conclusion of the Passover seder

and at end of weddings by breaking a glass,

 the destruction of Jerusalem was remembered.

From May 1948 to June 1967,

the years under Jordanian occupation,

Jerusalem Old City Walls

reaching the Kotel, Western Wall or

walking near the Temple Mount,

was only for the imagination or in a dream.

A view from a look out at Notre Dame,

over a dangerous No Man’s Land,

was as close as a Jew could get.

For those under the age of 60,

the drama and trauma of the Six-Day War,

and the resulting victory are taken for granted.

The rush of feelings, of a miraculous deliverance

against giant Arab armies attacking on all sides is lost.

The significance of

Jerusalem 50 and its many celebrations are shrugged off,

Birhat Kohanim at Kotel on Pesach 5777

for today tens of thousands can reach the Kotel Plaza to pray.

However, the Six-Day War,

also saw the return to Gush Etzion,

At Harel Memorial distance to Gush Etzion lost in 1948 to Jordan

a distance 16 kilometers south of the Knesset.

And in the north,

Kinerret at Sunrise

 the beautiful Kineret, Sea of Galilee,

Golan, Kinneret

had Syrians in those Golan Heights towering above.

 Hadassah Hospital on Mount Scopus

was closed after a convoy of medical staff was ambushed

and 73 people were murdered in April 1948.

Memorial at Hadassah hospital to the convoy which was attacked and murdered in 1948

This memorial wall in the Mt. Scopus memorial garden

was backdrop for a reenactment of Hadassah getting its keys back

from Mayor Teddy Kollek, in June of 1967.

And the West Bank,

which was for centuries known as Judea and Samaria,

Benyamin region of Judea and Samaria

 the land of Benjamin,

West Bank land of Bemyamin

stretches as far as the eye can see,

Tel Shiloh in Judea and Samaria

and includes Tel Shilo,

which for 369 years was location of the Holy Ark,

before the time of King David and the Temple in Jerusalem.

50 years.

Half a century.

This is a wondrous time to be in Jerusalem, Israel.

The days of choking polluted air

from vehicles stuck in heavy traffic on Yaffa Road,

Jerusalem light rain train Israel Yerushalayim

are vanishing memories, as the light rail trains run by.

50 years,

things are far from perfect,

but I would not want to go back to 51 years ago.